Music Reviews

  • The Antlers Familiars

    Following the direction they teased in 2012's Undersea, it should be more than clear on the strength of Familiars that The Antlers are for real.

    Forrest Cardamenis reviews...
  • Jack White Lazaretto

    Jack White has ascended to levels of rock royalty, but he has never seemed so uncomfortable. And that's a good thing.

    Forrest Cardamenis visits the...
  • Fucked Up Glass Boys

    Yes, the latest from ambitious punks Fucked Up steers away from the enormous rock-opera spectacle approach and settles into simply making a Fucked Up album. But is this still any reason to not give it your attention?

    Peter Quinton reviews Fucked Up's latest...
  • Howling Bells Heartstrings

    After a storming eponymous debut, Australian quartet Howling Bells took a detour up dull street with the largely disappointing follow up Radio Wars (2009), which was in turn followed by another lacklustre effort, The Loudest Engine in 2011. So is album number 4 another letdown, or does it mark a belated return to form?

    Graeme Marsh reviews...
  • Sharon Van Etten Are We There

    Sharon Van Etten has crafted another masterful record, singing about love in a manner that's open, sincere and relatable to anyone who's been in a relationship.

    Joe Marvilli listens to Sharon Van Etten pour her soul out again...
  • Hamilton Leithauser Black Hours

    The Walkmen lead singer releases his solo debut after 6 albums and over 13 years with the band.  The result is a balancing act that charts new directions in instrumentation and arrangement while maintaining some signature aesthetic elements of the New York City quintet.

    Ben Jones reviews...
  • Rival Sons Great Western Valkyrie

    Rival Sons continue their prolific output, and their 4th LP comes along and is more of the same. Sashaying rhythm sections lay down foundations for irresistible garage-tinged hooks and soaring vocals, channeling the likes of Hendrix, Zeppelin and The Stones from their melting pot. Rival Sons pull no punches, and rehash a retro-rock past into a seductive modern day panegyric.

    Carl Purvis thinks he's a peacock...
  • Parquet Courts Sunbathing Animal

    The latest effort by the Texas-via-Brooklyn transplants widens the scope of influences introduced in Light Up Gold, becoming more refined and pointed as they begin to settle into a new pattern whilst playing some of those old tricks.

    Juan Edgardo Rodríguez reviews...
  • Popstrangers Fortuna

    Popstrangers have followed up their excellent debut with a record boasting a much different sound to its predecessor. A lot of the rawness and unpredictability has gone, and has instead been replaced by a sense of sunbaked refrain that shows another string to the trio's bow. Much more pop, and much less strange.

    Carl Purvis reviews...
  • Teleman Breakfast

    On first play, Teleman’s Breakfast could have you thinking ‘a wimpy Julian Lennon’ or ‘poor man’s Flaming Lips’. Do repeated plays confirm the initial thoughts or are there hidden treasures in the debut offering from the ex-Pete And The Pirates boys?

    Graeme Marsh looks under the covers...
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